this is a great perspective on research as professional development at an individual and collective level. It would be interesting to track any projects that emerge within the rubric – I will be watching with interest. All the better if the findings are made freely available (OS) to the practitioners who are the beneficiaries of it……

Full On Learning

Over the past few weeks, I’ve had the pleasure of engaging in some of the very best learning conversations. I recognise these as the ‘best’ learning conversations because they are characterised by those (seemingly) luxurious and in-depth reflections on existing practice and observations. They are characterised by a meticulous observational analysis of learning and they are punctuated with frequent checks against assumptions and generalities. The way I know I’m really in one of these quality learning conversations is that the flow of dialogue is interspersed with an exchange of phrases such as, “…that reminds me of the work of [x]…” and “…ah, you should read the report on [y]” and “…I don’t know if you’ve come across it, but, I think you would really love the work of [z]”.

The on-going challenge of plate-spinning in the day job means that simply finding the kind of relevant research from leading…

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About catrionao

I'm a PhD student at Stirling University, studying a school based practice of teacher professional learning. I also do online facilitation for various organisations such as SELMAS and the Strategic Leadership Development Programme.
This entry was posted in CPD, innovation, Perspectives on Learning, Research. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to

  1. Thank you for the reblog. I agree that the findings need to be made freely available. I am hoping to do just this. It’s important for the practitioners to feel confident enough to do this, so that’s always my first consideration! I’d love to hear of any experience you have of working in this way. Thank you.

    • catrionao says:

      Thank you for leaving a comment (is it Zoe?) I’m very grateful and I was really impressed with your blog. There is a little bit of buzz around teacher/practitioner research in Scotland in the wake of the Teaching Scotland’s future report, and a few exciting developments – have you come across pedagoo.org? Check it out! If I hear of anything I think might interest you I’ll post it here, and as for open source I heard in a journal digest on twitter that harvard library was thinking of or already has cancelled their journal subscription fees – that would set a very interesting precedent!

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